Artist’s Proof – All Rock, No Roll: The Mezzotint Process by Clive Riggs SGFA

I have to reblog this, it is on one of my favourite artists (I’ve just bought one of his prints). Fabulous work.

SGFA Journal

Leaping Hare 2   30 x 42 cm  Mezzotint printed in burnt umber ink Shortlisted for the David Shepherd Wildlife Artist of the Year 2014 exhibition
Leaping Hare 2
42 x 30 cm
Mezzotint printed in burnt umber ink
Shortlisted for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation Wildlife Artist of the Year exhibition 2014

“I first turned to mezzotint in a dedicated way a couple of years ago. After many experiments with aquatint I still wasn’t achieving the deep, velvety black I was after.

You have to work towards those with aquatint, but with mezzotint that’s where you start. After that it’s a matter of keeping the darks intact. But there is a catch: it takes a lot of work to prepare a copper plate for scraping and burnishing.

Durer's Hare 20 x 30 cm
Durer’s Hare
30 x 20 cm

To lay a ground properly you spend hours standing over it with a rocker to work and rework the surface. It’s one of those repetitive, meditative physical processes that have their own strange appeal. Prepared plates are expensive, so now I prepare all of my own. I use 2.5 inch 85- and 100-lines…

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This entry was published on April 11, 2014 at 10:41 am and is filed under Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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